COMMON CONDITIONS

COMMON CONDITIONS2019-08-27T14:37:22+00:00
COMMON CONDITIONS OF THE SPINE

The information outlined below on common conditions and treatments of the spine is provided as a guide only and it is not intended to be comprehensive. Discussion with Mr Torrie is important to answer any questions that you may have.

For information about any additional conditions not featured within the site, please contact us for more information.

Symptoms of cervical spondylosis include neck pain and shoulder pain. The pain can be severe in some cases.

Occasional headaches may also occur, which usually start at the back of the head, just above the neck, and travel over the top to the forehead. Pain usually comes and goes, with flare-ups followed by symptom-free periods. Around 1 in 10 people develop long-lasting (chronic) pain.

Read More About the Diagnosis and Treatment of the degenerative cervical spine here.

Degenerative thoracic spine is a term used to describe a degenerative spine condition that has developed in the middle of the back (thoracic spine). Although the thoracic spine is less likely to deteriorate compared to the lumbar or cervical (neck) regions, as this section of the spine is not immune to degeneration and damage.

The thoracic spine is unique for several reasons. First, the 12 vertebrae of the thoracic spine (T1 to T12) connect directly to the ribs, meaning that they help the rib cage protect major organs like the heart, lungs and liver. Because they are anchored to the rib cage, the thoracic vertebrae do not have the same range of motion as vertebrae in the neck or lower back and therefore are not at the same risk of developing a degenerative spine condition.

Read More About the Diagnosis and Treatment of the degenerative thoracic spine here.

Back pain is very common and normally improves within a few weeks or months. Pain in the lower back (lumbago) is particularly common, although it can be felt anywhere along the spine – from the neck down to the hips.

Read More About the Diagnosis and Treatment of the degenerative lumbar spine here.

Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is an inflammatory condition that affects the joints in your spine. Spondylitis simply means inflammation of the spine.

As part of the body’s reaction to inflammation, calcium is laid down where the ligaments attach to the bones that make up the spine (vertebrae). This reduces the flexibility of your back and causes new bone to grow at the sides of the vertebrae. Eventually the individual bones of the spine may link up (fuse). This is called ankylosis and can be seen on x-rays.

Read More About the Diagnosis and Treatment of Ankylosing spondylitis here.

Spinal rheumatoid arthritis is a type of arthritis that affects the joints of the spine, more specifically sliding joints called facet joints. Two facet joints are located posteriorly on each vertebra behind the central spinal canal. Facet joints allow flexion and extension of the spine while inhibiting spinal rotation. Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disorder. The body’s defense system attacks its own health joint lining (synovium) as though it were a foreign invader such as a bacteria or virus. Synovium under attack ceases production of synovial fluid, the natural lubricant which keeps joints moving smoothly.

Read More About the Diagnosis and Treatment of spinal rheumatoid arthritis here.

Complex spinal deformities can are often serious conditions within the cervical, thoracic and/or lumbar spine, in which patients are debilitated by their suffering. This often ranges from chronic pain and a generally lowered quality of life to loss of bladder and/or bowel control and the inability to stand or walk.

Some of the most common conditions that can develop into complex spinal deformities include Scoliosis, Kyphosis and Spondylolisthesis.

Read More About the Diagnosis and Treatment of spinal deformity here.

Spinal cord trauma is damage to the spinal cord. It may result from direct injury to the cord itself or indirectly from disease of the nearby bones, tissues, or blood vessels.

Symptoms vary, depending on the location of the injury. SCI causes weakness and loss of feeling at, and below the injury. How severe the symptoms are depends on whether the entire cord is severely injured (complete) or only partially injured (incomplete).

An injury at and below the first lumbar vertebra does not cause SCI. But, it may cause cauda equina syndrome. This is an injury to the nerve roots in this area. This is a medical emergency and needs surgery right away.

Read More About the Diagnosis and Treatment of Spinal cord trauma here.

Spinal tumors are neoplasms located in the spinal cord. Extradural tumors are more common than intradural neoplasms.

Depending on their location, the spinal cord tumors can be:

Extradural – outside the dura mater lining (most common)
Intradural – part of the dura
Intramedullary – inside the spinal cord
Extramedullary- inside the dura, but outside the spinal cord

Read More About the Diagnosis and Treatment of spinal tumours here.

Spinal infections are rare infections that can involve the intervertebral disc space, the vertebral bones, the spinal canal, or adjacent soft tissues. Discitis refers to an infection of the intervertebral disc in the spine. Osteomyelitis refers to an infection of the vertebral bones in the spine. Infection may be caused by bacteria or fungal organisms, viruses, or can occur after a spinal procedure or surgery.

Read More About the Diagnosis and Treatment of Spinal infections here.

Discussion with Mr Torrie is important to answer any questions that you may have. For information about any additional conditions not featured within the site, please contact us for more information.

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