SPINAL TREATMENTS

SPINAL TREATMENTS2019-01-15T15:16:33+00:00
SPINAL TREATMENT OPTIONS

The information outlined below on common conditions and treatments of the spine is provided as a guide only and it is not intended to be comprehensive. Discussion with Mr Torrie is important to answer any questions that you may have.

For information about any additional conditions not featured within the site, please contact us for more information.

Exercises after a spinal cord injury can expedite the recovery process, in addition to offering myriad health benefits. Research conclusively demonstrates that exercise has many benefits including:

Improving mental health by reducing depression and anxiety
Reducing the risk of cancer
Improving symptoms of chronic pain
Helping you avoid chronic illnesses such as diabetes and osteoporosis
Reducing your risk of falls
Improving your chances of living a longer life

Talk to Mr Torrie before beginning any exercise routine, but once you get the go-ahead, consider one or more of these exercises. Guidelines recommend at least 150 minutes of moderate physical activity per week, as well as two days spent strength training, and these guidelines apply even to people who have experienced spinal cord injuries.

Read More About the physical therapy for the spine here.

Lumbar surgery refers to any type of surgery in the lumbar spine, or lower back, between one or more of the L1-S1 levels.

There are three general types of lumbar spine surgery that comprise the most common surgical procedures for the lower back: Lumbar decompression, laminectomy, lumbar microdiscectomy and lumbar fusion.

Read More About lumbar surgery here.

The goals of the vertebroplasty surgical procedure are to stabilize the spinal fracture and to stop the pain caused by the fracture. Vertebroplasty is considered a minimally invasive surgical procedure because the procedure is done through a small puncture in the patient’s skin (as opposed to an open incision). A typical vertebroplasty procedure, described below, usually takes about 1 hour to complete.

Read More about vertebroplasty here.

Cervical spine surgery is generally performed on an elective basis to treat either:

Nerve/spinal cord impingement (decompression surgery)
Spinal instability (fusion surgery).

The two procedures are often combined, as a decompression may de-stabilize the spine and create the need for a fusion to add stability. Spinal instrumentation (such as a small plate) can also be used to help add stability to the spinal construct.

Read More About Cervical spine surgery here.

Spinal reconstruction is used to stabilise the spine and correct significant deformities and misalignments such as cervical and thoracic disorders that cause pain, numbness, weakness and tingling in the back, legs, shoulders or arms. These conditions include:

Spinal stenosis
Degenerative disc disease
Spondylolisthesis (displaced disc)
Excessive kyphosis (curvature of the upper back)
Vertebral fracture
Scholiosis

Read More about spinal reconstruction here.

Spinal injections are used in two ways. First, they can be performed to diagnose the source of back, leg, neck, or arm pain (diagnostic). Second, spinal injections are used as a treatment to relieve pain (therapeutic).

Most spinal injections are performed as one part of a more comprehensive treatment program. Simultaneous treatment nearly always includes an exercise program to improve or maintain spinal mobility (stretching exercises) and stability (strengthening exercises).

Read More About spinal injections here.

Discussion with Mr Torrie is important to answer any questions that you may have. For information about any additional conditions not featured within the site, please contact us for more information.

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